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Posts Tagged ‘Non-fiction books for boys’

I’m reluctant to title this blog as “Great Books for Boys” when, in fact, I know that it’s not reasonable to assume that there are books that are really only geared for boys or girls.  I do know, however, that this post won’t include any of the Fancy Nancy books or the story of Cinderella or the Angelina Ballerina  stories — which, by the way, is one of my very favorite series.  I’ve selected books that I do feel, however, are sure fire hits with most boys who love the idea of adventure and exploration.  Watch out boys!  The girls will be stealing these books out from under your noses to read when you’re not looking!

My own sons while growing up, couldn’t put the books down.  My oldest son is standing here in front of the Atlantic Ocean on the OuterBanks of North Carolina, totally oblivious to the dancing dolphins and parading pelicans as he’s absorbed in some wild adventure.  He was too engrossed in the story to even sit down to read!  This is as it should be!

Now let’s talk about some of these books and tell me what you think.

                                             

 

                                           Spy Cat by Peg Kehret

This Newbery Award winning book is a fun read.  The story is written from two perspectives—a cat and a young boy who loves to spy.  While the story isn’t riveting, it does have a contemporary theme about burglars and kidnapping.  It demonstrates the bravery of a young boy along with the intelligence and creativity of a pet cat.  Good read for those young readers. Ask kids to talk about what were smart things the young spy did and maybe some things that might not have been such a good idea.  Ages 8-11.

                             

                                  The Indian in the Cupboard – by Lynne Reid Banks

Now here’s a winner.  My boys absolutely loved this series when they were young.  And while I heard them talking about it, I never read it.  What a clever idea for a story,,,magical.  This even makes a dandy read-aloud to all ages.  What could be more exciting than following the ad ventures of a plastic miniature cowboy and Indian as they magically become alive?  It’s a great opportunity to talk about friendship and the responsibilities that are an important part of friendship.  You know…always a lesson to be learned and talked about.  Ages 7-10

   

                           Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca

Even though the U.S. space program may be on a temporary (we hope) hiatus, kids still love learning all about the original astronauts and going to the moon.  The illustrations and story here about the Apollo 11 flight to the moon will have even the die-hard fiction readers intrigued.  Kids who love learning about space flight will love it the best.  It’s a winner. Ages 4-10

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

             Looking for good books for young adult boys?  Well—look no further.  This book really surprised me—nothing like anything I’ve read before.  It’s sort of autobiographical of the Native American author, Alexie.  It’s written from a young 14 yr. old Indian’s view and talks about living on a reservation “rez” in Washington.  He’s bound and determined to fight against the odds thrown at him—a disability at birth, poverty and alcoholism on the rez and in his family, dysfunctional school and bullies all around.  Pick it up and read it together.  The cartoon illustrations are great fun.  A must read for boys, especially boys who live on a reservation.  Highly motivational.  A note…there are some references to “boy stuff” and some language some may shrink at, but it’s real and heart wrenching yet said with humor.  See—I can’t stop talking about it!  Ages 13-16+

 

 

 

 

             

 

                                    Incredible Explosions by Stephen Biesty( illustrator) and Richard Platt (text)

Stephen Biesty, who illustrated the book Egypt in Spectacular Cross-Section  and Into the Unknown , creates a fascinating close up look at a variety of things from windmills, a base station in the Antarctic and even the human body.  We’re supposed to provide more non-fiction sources for our children these days and this is a great place to look.  You can spend hours—OK, maybe not hours—but a good long time, looking closely and learning the minute details about how things are built and work.  Guaranteed hit with the older guys.  Ages 9+

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